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Space Shuttles
STS-093; First Shuttle Mission Commanded By a Woman
STS093-327-021 (23-27 July 1999) --- Astronaut Steven A. Hawley, mission specialist, runs on a treadmill on the middeck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The exercise helps to evaluate the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) as planned hardware for International Space Station (ISS).
STS093-347-015 (23-27 July 1999) --- Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, mission commander, loads a roll of film into a still camera on Columbia's middeck. Collins is the first woman mission commander in the history of human space flight.
STS093-347-027 (23-27 July 1999) --- Astronauts Steven A. Hawley (left) and Michel Tognini, mission specialists, are pictured with the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) on the middeck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. SWUIS was used during the mission to image planets and other solar system bodies in order to explore their atmospheres and surfaces in ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum, which astronomers value for diagnostic work. Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) of France.
STS093-702-041 (23 July 1999)--- This 70mm frame shows the Chandra X-Ray observatory, backdropped against a desert area in Namibia, just before its release from Columbia's payload bay. The primary duty of the STS-93 crew was to deploy the world's most powerful X-Ray telescope. It was also one of the first actions of the astronauts, occurring just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit. This scene is one of a series of still photos recorded by the crew before and during the deployment of the 50,162 pound observatory.
STS093-702-048 (23 July 1999)--- This 70mm frame shows the Chandra X-Ray observatory, backdropped against a desert area in Namibia, just before its release from Columbia's payload bay. The primary duty of the STS-93 crew was to deploy the world's most powerful X-Ray telescope. It was also one of the first actions of the astronauts, occurring just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit. This scene is one of a series of still photos recorded by the crew before and during the deployment of the 50,162 pound observatory. (23 July 1999)--- This 70mm frame shows the Chandra X-Ray observatory just before it was tilted upward for its release from Columbia's payload bay. The primary duty of the STS-93 crew was to deploy the world's most powerful X-Ray telescope. It was also one of the first actions of the astronauts, occurring just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit. This scene is one of a series of still photos recorded by the crew before and during the deployment of the 50,162 pound observatory.
STS093-705-020 (23 July 1999)--- This 70mm frame shows the Chandra X-Ray observatory just before it was tilted upward for its release from Columbia's payload bay. The primary duty of the STS-93 crew was to deploy the world's most powerful X-Ray telescope. It was also one of the first actions of the astronauts, occurring just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit. This scene is one of a series of still photos recorded by the crew before and during the deployment of the 50,162 pound observatory.
STS093-706-035 (23 July 1999)--- This 70mm frame shows the Chandra X-Ray observatory backdropped against the darkness of space not long after its release from Columbia's payload bay. The primary duty of the STS-93 crew was to deploy the world's most powerful X-Ray telescope. It was also one of the first actions of the crew, occurring just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit. This scene is one of a series of still photos recorded by the crew before and during the deployment of the 50,162 pound observatory.
STS093-706-039 (23 July 1999)--- This 70mm frame shows the Chandra X-Ray observatory backdropped against the darkness of space not long after its release from Columbia's payload bay. The primary duty of the STS-93 crew was to deploy the world's most powerful X-Ray telescope. It was also one of the first actions of the crew, occurring just a few hours following the shuttle's arrival in Earth orbit. This scene is one of a series of still photos recorded by the crew before, during and after the deployment of the 50,162 pound observatory.

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All images © NASA (Unless Otherwise Noted). Used by permission.

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